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Frequently Asked Questions
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For children in need of Adoptive or Foster parents, you can provide a lifeline that assures these children someone cares about them. The following questions and answers can assist you in your decision to help a child in need.

What is the difference between fostering and adopting?
What kinds of people are adoptive and foster parents?
Do I have to make a lot of money to adopt or foster?
Who are the children available for adoption or needing foster homes?
What does “special-needs” mean?
Is training provided?
Will I have help?
Why choose Kansas Children's Service League?
What is the Process? - Adoption
What's the Process? - Foster Care
What is a family?


Answers
What is the difference between fostering and adopting?
While the process to become a foster or an adoptive parent is similar, the primary difference is foster parents offer temporary care and adoptive parents provide a permanent home to children in need of care. Through adoption, parents become legally and fiscally responsible the children in their home. Children living with foster parents are the legal and fiscal responsibility of the state.
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What kinds of people are adoptive and foster parents?
All kinds of people can be and are adoptive and foster parents. You don’t have to be rich, own your own home or have a college degree. You can be single or married, work outside or inside the home, have children at home or not. What really matters is your ability to love and support a child – either for a temporary period of time or permanently as a member of your family.
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Do I have to make a lot of money to adopt or foster?
No. Many adoptive and foster parents have very modest incomes. For families choosing to adopt, subsidy programs may be available to assist them with the costs of caring for special-needs children. Financial aid programs such as medical cards, tax credits, grants, and other support payments may also apply.

Foster parents receive a small stipend in addition to support for each child’s physical or mental health needs. Extra reimbursement for each child’s special needs is determined on a case-by case basis. Some reimbursement for day care expenses may be reimbursed, with prior approval from a child's case manager. Check with your League Foster Home Social Worker for details.
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Who are the children available for adoption or needing foster homes?
Children awaiting adoption or in foster care range from newborn to 17 years of age. However, most are over the age of seven, come from a variety of ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds, and may have special needs. Many children are waiting for adoption with their siblings, looking for families who will keep them together.
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What does “special-needs” mean?
The majority of children awaiting adoption or needing foster homes have been removed from their biological homes because of abuse, neglect, or abandonment. Their special needs may range from mild to severe, including learning difficulties, physical limitations, emotional or behavioral challenges, and difficulties adjusting to new families.
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Is training provided?
Yes, you are required to attend a valuable 30-hour Partnering for Safety and Permanencey - Model Approach to Partnerships in Parenting (PS-MAPP) class to help you prepare for your new role as an adoptive parent. In the span of a child’s life, this is a very short amount of time.
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Will I have help?
Yes. Ongoing support is available, including support groups, respite, and continued training and education. Additionally, an Adoption or Foster Home Social Worker will assist you through the preparation process and provide continued guidance.
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Why choose Kansas Children's Service League?
Kansas Children’s Service League prepares and supports adoptive and foster families statewide. Families working with KCSL have the opportunity to foster children who are temporarily in the state’s care or who are awaiting a permanent adoptive home. Because we work with both systems, Kansas Children’s Service League adoptive and foster parents can easily move from one process to the other if there is an opportunity and desire to provide a permanent home to a child already in their care or to other children needing foster care. Kansas Children’s Service League’s specially trained Adoption and Foster Home Social Workers can provide more information and assistance regarding these transitions.
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What is the Process? - Adoption
1. Call 1-877-530-5275, toll free. You will be sent information that explains the process and answers some basic questions.

2. If you want to move forward, you will be invited to an evening Orientation meeting that will allow you to meet agency staff and obtain additional information. You can choose to register for a PS-MAPP class in your area at the time you make the initial call, or attend Orientation. Both Orientation and PS-MAPP will help you make an informed decision about becoming an Adoptive parent, and identify the profile of a child that best fits in your home. You will be asked to complete a series of background checks as part of the assessment process, and be assigned to an Adoption Social Worker in your area.

3. You and your Social Worker will complete a thorough Family Assessment process, culminating in a lengthy document that is used to help professionals match your family with a child needing a home.

4. Following the completion of your Family Assessment, you will be approved for consideration as an adoptive parent and begin working with your Adoption Social Worker to match your family with a child waiting for a permanent home. The process of finding the right family for a child sometimes takes several months.

5. You’ll receive all available information about a child that fits your preferences and family profile, so you can decide whether it looks like a good match.

6. If it does, you’ll participate in a pre-placement visits with the child, and have the opportunity to talk with the child’s teachers, counselors, and other important people in the child’s life.

7. Now the child joins your family, with your social worker continuing services until the adoption is legalized, and for up to 12 months after that.

8. The paperwork passes through your caseworker, your attorney, and finally to court, where the adoption is finalized.
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What's the Process? - Foster Care
1. Call 1-877-530-5275, toll free. You will be sent information that explains the process of becoming a foster parent and answers some basic questions.

2. If you want to move forward, you will be invited to an evening Orientation meeting that will allow you to meet agency staff and obtain additional information. You can choose to register for a PS-MAPP class in your area at the time you make the initial call, or attend Orientation. Both Orientation and PS-MAPP will help you make an informed decision about becoming a Foster parent, and identify the profile of a child that best fits in your home. You will be asked to complete a series of background checks as part of the assessment process, and be assigned to a Foster Home Social Worker in your area.

3. You and your Social Worker will complete a thorough Family Assessment process, which will help determine what type of foster care would be most appropriate for your home. The types of foster care homes include Emergency, Satellite, Diversion and others. Ask your Foster Home Social Worker for details.

4. Following completion of your Family Assessment, your Social Worker will help you gather the necessary information to obtain a Foster Home license from the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). A representative from KDHE will conduct a "walk through" of your home, and complete the necessary regulatory process.

5. You will be contacted when a child comes into care who fits your preferences and family profile. When possible, you’ll receive all available information about the child so you can decide whether he or she looks like a good match with your family. However, because foster care often is needed in a hurry, you may not have a lot of lead time before a child joins you home, particularly if you decide to offer emergency foster care.

6. The child joins your family! The child’s social worker and your Foster Home Social Worker will continue to support your family while the child is placed in your home. League support is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
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What is a family?
A family accepts life’s challenges together. Shares its victories together. A family travels life’s highest and lowest roads together. A family laughs together. A family cries together. A family listens. A family lasts a lifetime because a family is built on love, and no foundation is stronger than love.
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